Women's Health & Hormone Balancing

Learn more about Spring Creek Medical Center's hormone balancing in Logan

Women's Health & Hormone Balancing

Learn more about Spring Creek Medical Center's hormone balancing in Logan
hormone balancing logan

Hormonal Imbalance Treatment in Logan

To understand female hormonal imbalance, it’s important to know how a normal menstrual cycle works. A menstrual cycle is the result of a hormonal interaction between the pituitary gland in the brain and the ovaries. Every month the female sex hormones prepare the body to support a pregnancy and without fertilization, there is menstruation (a period).

There’s no single test available for doctors to diagnose a hormonal imbalance. Begin by making an appointment with your doctor for a physical exam. Make sure you are prepared to describe your symptoms and the timeline along which they’ve occurred. It’s also helpful to bring a list of all medications, vitamins, and supplements you’re currently taking.

As you read the information below, you’ll discover what hormone imbalance is (along with the associated symptoms), frequently asked questions, and more! Click below to start your individual treatment today.

Understanding the Menstrual Cycle

A menstrual cycle is determined by the number of days from the first day of one period to the first day of the next. Day one of the menstrual cycle is the first of full bleeding day of the period. A typical cycle is approximately 24 to 35 days (average 28 days for most women). It is not abnormal for a woman’s cycle to occasionally be shorter or longer.

On Day 1 of the menstrual cycle, estrogen and progesterone levels are low. Low levels of estrogen and progesterone signal the pituitary gland to produce Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH). FSH begins the process of maturing a follicle (fluid-filled sac in the ovary containing an egg).

The follicle produces more estrogen to prepare the uterus for pregnancy. At ovulation, usually around Day 12 — 14, increased estrogen levels trigger a sharp rise in Luteinizing Hormone (LH) from the pituitary gland and cause the release of the egg from the follicle.

The menstrual cycle occurs in three phases: follicular, ovulatory and luteal. The first half of the cycle is known as the follicular phase and the second half of the cycle is considered the luteal phase. Midway through the cycle between days 12 and 16 ovulation occurs, known as the ovulatory phase.

The ruptured follicle (corpus luteum) now secretes progesterone and estrogen to continue to prepare the uterus for pregnancy. If the egg is not fertilized, estrogen and progesterone levels drop and, on Day 28, the menses begin.

Hormone Imbalance

Knowing how a normal menstrual cycle works helps you understand the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), perimenopause, and menopause. Symptoms are often the result of too much or too little hormone(s).

During Perimenopause

Hormone levels fluctuate as a result of fewer ovulations—so less progesterone is produced in the second half of the menstrual cycle. Periods can be erratic, skipped, or involve heavy bleeding /clots. Symptoms result from the change in the ratio of estrogen to progesterone and the imbalance creates the symptoms.

During Menopause

Estrogen is no longer produced by the ovaries and is made in smaller amounts by the adrenal glands and in fat tissue. Estrogen is still produced in the body, but in lower amounts than younger cycling women. The most significant hormone change of menopause is the lack of progesterone. As you transition through menopause, you may experience a variety of related symptoms. Some may occur infrequently, and others daily. The intensity of your symptoms can also fluctuate from mild to severe. All of these symptoms occur because of hormone imbalance. Approximately 10-25 percent of women will continue to have significant symptoms after menopause.

hormone balancing logan

Symptoms of a Hormone Imbalance

  • Anxiety, Irritability, Mood Swings
  • Breast Changes
  • Cycle Changes
  • Fuzzy Thinking
  • Headaches and Migraines
  • Hot Flashes and Night Sweats
  • Loss of Libido
  • Trouble Sleeping and Fatigue
  • Vaginal Dryness
  • Weight Gain
  • Anxiety, Irritability, Mood Swings
  • Breast Changes
  • Cycle Changes
  • Fuzzy Thinking
  • Headaches and Migraines
  • Hot Flashes and Night Sweats
  • Loss of Libido
  • Trouble Sleeping and Fatigue
  • Vaginal Dryness
  • Weight Gain

PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is fairly common among women. Additionally, PCOS is not a disorder of the ovaries, but rather a hormonal disorder. There are many different hormones in the body; their relationships are complex and they dictate the way many bodily systems function. PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) affects many different hormones in many different ways, which is why no two cases present with the same set of symptoms. PCOS is complex and, at Spring Creek Medical Center, we focus on a specialized individual approach to treatment.

—Frequently Asked Questions—

How do I balance my hormones?
Hormones are balanced using several methods. At Spring Creek medical we focus on Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy. We try to restore the hormones to their normal balance. All approaches are individualized and patient specific.
How do you replace hormones?

Creams: Creams are used with a plant based material and are altered to be bioidentical to those produced by the body. These are applied once or twice daily either daily to the skin where they can be absorbed by the body. This is most often done first to determine dosing.
Pellet Therapy: Pellets are a small pressed powder that are inserted just under the skin in the fat area around the hip area. These are usually placed every 3-4 months and naturally dissolve in the body

How can I find out if I have a hormone imbalance?
Our Provider will meet with you and go over your symptoms. After a physical exam tests are ordered to determine if there is a hormone imbalance. After tests are received back they are gone over with the patient by the provider and a specific care plan is then designed with the patient.
Will insurance cover Hormone Replacement Therapy?
Based on symptoms discussed with the patient and the provider most insurances will cover some aspects of hormone replacement therapy. Insurance will cover the cost of office visits and lab testing. However, there may be some labs that are not covered by insurance. Some insurances will cover the actual hormone replacement prescriptions and some will not cover the replacement therapy.
How soon after starting therapy will I feel better?
Most women report relief within 3 months of starting hormone replacement therapy. After 3 months of therapy the patient will follow up with the provider again. At this time the provider will order follow up lab testing to determine therapeutic levels and possible adjustments that need to be made. After follow up testing if adjustments are needed to be made they will follow up and go over those changes with the provider.
nurse practitioner logan

Meet our Nurse Practitioner

A nurse practitioner is a nurse with an advanced degree that has passed a national board. Nurse practitioners prescribe medications, treat illnesses, and administer physical exams. Tiffany Schultz is our onsite Nurse Practitioner that has years of experience offering health and hormone balancing. She’s focused on attending to your medical needs as well. Click below to learn more or schedule an appointment today!

Spring Creek Medical Center in Logan, Utah

(435) 792-9400

267 Spring Creek Pkwy Providence, UT 84332

Hours:
Monday - Thursday:
8:00 am – 6:00 pm

Friday - Saturday:
By Appointment

Spring Creek Medical Center successfully treats back pain, neck pain, knee pain, arthritis, headaches and migraines and has helped many individuals live a pain-free life. Our chiropractor, physical therapist, massage therapists and nurse practitioner proudly serve all of Cache Valley, including Logan, Providence, Smithfield, Nibley, Hyrum and North Logan, Utah.